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How To Make UK Garage Beats in Reason 10

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irb5iqO8MzI

Reason is the perfect platform for creating UK Garage tracks—whether you’re going for an old-school four-to-the-floor vibe, or a modern 2-Step banger. Check out this video by producer, artist and tutor Paul Ortiz to learn.
 

UK Garage music has a long and complicated history with roots in House, R&B and Jungle music. Garage music got its start and its name from a club in New York City called Paradise Garage, where DJs were known for playing particularly soulful House music. UK DJ’s like Tuff Jam and Dreem Team started playing sped-up Dub mixes of these American “Garage” records at after-parties in the early 90s to keep weary dancers shaking their groove things until the wee hours of the morning.

By 1994 the UK started developing a unique take on Garage music called “Speed Garage.” Harder, faster and bassier than its American counterpart, Speed Garage features four-on-the-floor drum beats with syncopated claps and hi hats, and heavily affected vocal samples from Soul, House and R&B records.

By 1999, the sound of UK Garage had evolved—this new subgenre of Garage music known as “2-Step” eschewed the traditional 4×4 drums of Garage music for jittery, beat-skipping kick patterns more akin to Hip-Hop than House music. Producers like Zed Bias & El-B brought a darker sound to 2-Step, paving the way for even more sub-genres such as Grime and Dubstep.

There are a lot of different ways to go about making a UK Garage track, but no matter your approach, Reason 10 has you covered.
 

Making UK Garage Beats in Reason

A banging drumbeat is the backbone to any UK Garage track. Start by dialing in a tempo of about 130 BPM, and then use the Groove Mixer to increase the global shuffle to about 55% to give your tracks the signature UK Garage swing.

Trigger pre-made Club loops with Dr. Octo Rex, create step-sequenced drum patterns with ReDrum, or use the legendary Kong Drum Designer to play your own unique rhythm by hand. For old-school UK Garage and Speed Garage beats, start with a classic four-on-the-floor drum pattern—then add a syncopated hi-hat groove and some crispy clap sounds on the 3. If you’re going for more of a 2-Step, Grime or old-school Dubstep vibe, create an irregular kick pattern that skips a beat every now and then.

Most UK Garage basslines are subby and repetitive to keep people dancing. While just about any of Reason’s synths can create a killer bass line, Subtractor is loaded with dark, heavy Club and Garage bass patches to get you started. Use Reason’s Dual Arpeggio to quickly and easily put together syncopated bass lines that dance around your drumbeat.

Next, lay down some rich chords with sampled keyboard, electric piano and synthesizer patches using NN-19 and NN-XT. And don’t worry—if you’re not a pianist you can still create lush chords with the touch of a button using Reason’s Scales & Chords player. Simply set the key of the song and dial in the complexity to create powerful, emotionally resonant chords with a single finger.

Now that you’ve got the basic rhythm track together, it’s time to bring in a soulful vocal sample. Use Reason’s built-in time stretching and pitch shifting abilities to transform vocal tracks to fit with your song, or chop them up using NN-XT and play each slice with a MIDI keyboard to create a fresh new reinterpretation.

Now that you know the foundations making UK Garage beats in Reason 10, it’s time to let the rhythm take control!

Start your free trial of Reason 10 today

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Compositional Tips w/ Spitfire Audio’s ‘Chamber Strings’ – Part 2

Welcome back to another series of compositional tips and tricks using instruments by Spitfire Audio, this time ‘Chamber Strings’. We’ve previously looked at the Orchestral Swarm instrument pack, notably used by Hanz Zimmer for the Blue Planet 2 score, as well as the Chamber Evolutions pack, created with famed Icelandic composer Ólafur Arnalds. Now, our resident compositional wizard Kevin Kerrigan turns his attention to ‘Chamber Strings’. The focus this time is more immediately concerned with teaching ways of composing with tools such as this, as opposed to a tour of a new instrument. Music composition forms an integral part of our music production courses, including our flagship BA (Hons) in Music Production and Sound Engineering, quality assured by Middlesex University.

In the second part of the series, Kevin turns his attention to adding inversions to a chord sequence. To demonstrate this he invites us to observe a mystery score he’s been working on, built with a large reliance on minor chords. As he’s stressed before, playing these chords in their root forms sounds slightly stunted, so open voicings, adding different mics and adding inverted harmonies are all drawn upon to widen the scope of what’s made here.

As well as the aforementioned degree course in music production and sound engineering, we have also developed a new BA in Music Production and DJ Practice, again quality-assured by Middlesex University, which launches its first term next September. If you’d like to examine some shorter courses in London you can find the full list here. Or, if you’re not based in the UK, why not check out our production courses in Los Angeles or onlineGet in touch if you have any more questions.

Register to Access Free Courses, Plugins, Projects, Samples & More

When you register with Point Blank, you access an array of free sounds, plugins, online course samples, access to our social network Plugged In and much more! Simply register below and visit our Free Stuff page to get your hands on a range of exclusive music-making tools and tutorials provided by the team. Fill your boots!

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The post Compositional Tips w/ Spitfire Audio’s ‘Chamber Strings’ – Part 2 appeared first on Point Blank’s Online Magazine.

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Drew Morisey x DJ Ravine: Three Essential Social Media Tips for Artists

In today’s world, social media is absolutely vital to the career of any artist in any discipline. With music it is especially so because, let’s face it, most young people want to be musicians, creating even more of a challenge to stand out. To do this you need to be making music that is fresh and interesting, but that alone isn’t enough – chances are when you’re starting out you don’t have a marketing team behind you, so you need to get yourself out there. Grab a few key tips to get yourself started below and for comprehensive tuition on navigating the music business, check out our Music Industry courses.

For our latest video, we had two people that know a thing or two about social media sit down and discuss tactics. Our own DJ Ravine has built his YouTube following to just under half a million subscribers and his guest, Drew Morisey, has developed his How To Rap Brand to reach over 150k. Between them, you can be sure that by following their advice will certainly give your social media clout a boost.

The main points of discussion in the video are consistency, keywords and engaging fans or followers. Consistency is key so that people begin to expect activity at certain times and your presence becomes a constant feature of their social media browsing. Keywords and trends are a great way of expanding your reach into new areas and gaining followers. Engaging fans is perhaps the most useful when you’re starting out, as it not only keeps you in the minds of your connections but it does wonders for how you pop up within social media websites’ algorithms.

As well as our music industry-specific courses, these lessons form a big part of many of our music courses. For instance, in our BA (Hons) in Music Production and Sound Engineering degree, as well as our new BA (Hons) in Music Production and DJ Practice, you will find modules focused on building your brand and getting what you want from the industry. If the music industry aspect is your biggest passion we have also developed a BA (Hons) in Music Industry Management, launching next year. All of our degrees are quality-assured by Middlesex University. For more info get in touch.

Register to Access Free Courses, Plugins, Projects, Samples & More

When you register with Point Blank, you access an array of free sounds, plugins, online course samples, access to our social network Plugged In and much more! Simply register below and visit our Free Stuff page to get your hands on a range of exclusive music-making tools and tutorials provided by the team. Fill your boots!

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The post Drew Morisey x DJ Ravine: Three Essential Social Media Tips for Artists appeared first on Point Blank’s Online Magazine.

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How to Make a Drum n Bass Track in Reason

Drum ‘N’ Bass is a dance music subgenres that evolved from the tangled web of the UK’s underground rave scene in the 1980s and ‘90s, with roots in the broader genre of Breakbeat. Drum & Bass combines heavy synthesized bass lines with vocal samples from soul and reggae records to create an bold, energetic, and supremely danceable wall of sound. In this article and accompanying video, artist and producer Protostar will show you how to record a DnB track in Reason 10.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXHmuEEd8ZU

The defining element of Drum & Bass is its signature rhythm: it starts with the kick drum on beat 1, a snare hit on beat 2, a syncopated kick just after beat 3 on the “and,” and a final snare on beat 4. This core one-two-and-four pattern forms the heart of the groove and is almost never deviated from. Finally, it needs to be fast—tempos usually range between 160 and 180 BPM.

Load a drum loop into Dr. Octo Rex (anything with “DnB” in the name should suffice) and use the beatmaking tools in Reason 10 to make it your own. Hit the “Copy Loop to Track” button to create a MIDI track from your loop, or create your own pattern in Drum Sequencer—and use it to trigger dance sounds from Umpf Club Drums, one-shot samples from ReDrum, synthesized and acoustic drums from Kong, or all of the above. Attack and decay controls come in handy for fine-tuning stacked kicks and snares: try using just the attack from one sound, the body of another, and the decay tail of a third. Then sprinkle in a variety of loops, extra hits, and dub-like reverb and delay to keep the rhythm interesting.

The addition of a pounding synth bass serves a melodic role, and is what sets DnB apart from other dance genres. Sine and Triangle waves are great for a nice round bottom, squares and saw waves add edgy harmonics, and the right wavetable or granular patch can really get things sounding nasty. All of this is possible with Europa and Thor’s multiple oscillators, but stacking several synths in a Combinator will create a thick, complex sound. Flip the rack around and experiment with patching various filters and envelopes to the Synchronous Effects Modulator and Pulsar Dual LFO devices to give the bass some movement.

Now it’s time to add some extra flavor with samples. Samples are a staple of DnB (typically vocal phrases lifted from old soul and reggae records), and serve to break up the monotony of a constantly pounding beat. Load samples into Dr. Octo Rex or record your own, then slice them up or stretch the possibilities with the Grain Sample Manipulator. Almost any other sound can be added to the mix to give it character—soft dreamy pads, sampled keyboards, erratic zaps and sweeps, or just plain old noise.

Now that you’ve learned how to make a Drum & Bass track in Reason 10, it’s time to “break” it down for yourself!

Start your free trial of Reason 10 today.

Follow Protostar on Facebook, Twitter, Twitch, YouTube, Soundcloud.

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Compositional Tips w/ Spitfire Audio’s ‘Chamber Strings’ – Part 1

Welcome back to another series of compositional tips and tricks using instruments by Spitfire Audio, this time ‘Chamber Strings’. We’ve previously looked at the Orchestral Swarm instrument pack, notably used by Hanz Zimmer for the Blue Planet 2 score, as well as the Chamber Evolutions pack, created with famed Icelandic composer Ólafur Arnalds. Now, our resident compositional wizard Kevin Kerrigan turns his attention to ‘Chamber Strings’. The focus this time is more immediately concerned with teaching ways of composing with tools such as this, as opposed to a tour of a new instrument. Music composition forms an integral part of our music production courses, including our flagship BA (Hons) in Music Production and Sound Engineering, quality assured by Middlesex University.

For part 1 of this new series, Kevin is interested in getting us started as quickly as possible and so runs through a number of ways he likes to get started on projects. This leads on to the main focus of the video, which are the ways you can choose articulations and vary the voicing of chords to enhance a project’s musicality. We love a lot of what Spitfire Audio have to offer and Chamber Strings is no different. Try following some of these suggestions made in the video and you should hopefully add another couple of strings to your bow (ahem) as composers. Don’t forget to check back for part 2 next week.

As well as the aforementioned degree course in music production and sound engineering, we have also developed a new BA in Music Production and DJ Practice, again quality-assured by Middlesex University, which launches its first term next September. If you’d like to examine some shorter courses in London you can find the full list here. Or, if you’re not based in the UK, why not check out our production courses in Los Angeles or online. Get in touch if you have any more questions.

Register to Access Free Courses, Plugins, Projects, Samples & More

When you register with Point Blank, you access an array of free sounds, plugins, online course samples, access to our social network Plugged In and much more! Simply register below and visit our Free Stuff page to get your hands on a range of exclusive music-making tools and tutorials provided by the team. Fill your boots!

LONDON W OUTLINE

The post Compositional Tips w/ Spitfire Audio’s ‘Chamber Strings’ – Part 1 appeared first on Point Blank’s Online Magazine.

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How to Make Lofi Hip-Hop Beats in Reason 10

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzNiO_gqFZU

Over the last decade, the popularity of “lofi” hip-hop has exploded thanks to producers like Nujabes and J Dilla. Lofi hip-hop is all about soft, introspective instrumentals—and Reason 10 has everything you need to lay down the perfect vibe. In this tutorial, producer MG the Future will show you how to make lofi hip hop beats in Reason 10.

Lofi hip-hop revolves around a chill, relaxed beat with a loose swing—often sampled from vintage funk and soul recordings to retain the human element of the performance. Reason 10 is packed with classic hip-hop and vintage break beat loops to get you started. Just select your favorite sample from the Browser and drag it into the Sequencer window. Adjust the BPM using the tempo controller to dial in the perfect downtempo pace, and use Reason’s built-in time stretching and compression capabilities to sync your sample to a loopable 4 or 8-bar clip.

Chop and screw samples using Dr. Octo Rex to create unique grooves by altering individual beat, or play a fresh new beat by triggering sample slices using Reason’s iconic Kong drum machine. Connect Kong to the built-in Pattern Sequencer or new Drum Sequencer Rack Extension and select from dozens of preset drum patterns for instant inspiration, or create your own patterns using advanced 16-step sequencers.

Reason 10 has a near-limitless supply of sampled keyboards and synthesizers to create rich chords and unique lofi textures. Lay down smooth bass lines, soft synth pads, and simple leads with sampled instruments using ID8 or NN-XT. Experiment with colorful keys in Radical Piano, gentle bells in Klang, or the worldly sounds of Pangea for the perfect multi-cultural aesthetic. Build beautiful, lush chords in seconds by pairing any instrument with Reason’s Scales & Chords—simply select the key of your song and play a single note on your keyboard to create rich, full chords perfect for lofi hip-hop.

It’s not called lofi for nothing, and Reason 10 is loaded with the perfect processors for adding vintage vibe. Use Audiomatic Retro Transformer to instantly add grainy goodness to your tracks. With options like radio, VHS, vinyl and more, Retro Transformer is perfect for adding an instant lofi effect. Top it all off with Scream 4 to add harmonic saturation modeled after tubes, tape and analog circuitry, and you’ve got yourself a certified head-bobber.

Now that you know the basics of how to make lofi beats in Reason 10, it’s time to make the boomin’ and bappin’ happen!

Start your free trial of Reason 10 today.

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Download Andrew Huang's FREE patches for Europa by Reason

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iF1spPcahSg

Andrew Huang is a Toronto-based music and video producer with a penchant for working within absurd, self-imposed limitations. 

A versatile and prolific musician, he has released over 2,000 songs in a massive range of genres. He is perhaps best known for the strange feats of musicianship which have earned him over 1.3 million subscribers and 170 million views on his YouTube channel: He has rapped 300 words in a minute, and maybe you know him from his Glorious MIDI unicorn video?

In this video, Andrew tries our latest creation Europa by Reason (VST / AU plugin available for any DAW) and boldly sets out to “turn any sound into a WAY COOLER SOUND”. Watch the video to learn more about our new wavetable synthesizer’s powerful sonic possibilites and maybe learn a new trick or two?

Andrew also created 20 custom patches for Europa which you can download from the link below and load up in Europa (the patches are already included in the VST / AU version).
 

Download
   Download Andrew Huang’s Europa patches!

 

Learn more about Europa by Reason and try it out directly in your browser!

Try Reason 10 free for 30 days!

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Watch Part 3 of our Miniseries: Ableton Live 10 In Depth – Mixing w/ Push 2

In a new series, we take a look at Ableton Live 10 in depth with Thomas Glendenning, one of many of our expert instructors in London and one of just 200 (give or take) certified Ableton trainers in the world. For the second video, the focus is on using Ableton’s amazingly intuitive Push 2 controller which is frankly the best and easiest controller to use with Ableton Live 10, due to the level of integration. Thomas teaches Introduction to Music Production (Ableton) with us here in London which, as well as acting as a standalone course, is an integral part of our degree and diploma programmes, both in London and online.

Watch the video below to watch Thomas create a mix with his demo track. Learn about panning, volume levels, compression and EQ, as well as some tips and tricks to help make the mix as clean as possible.

Want to learn how to use Ableton from expert instructors like Thomas? As well as the ITP course, we offer much longer and comprehensive courses, foremost among them our new BA (Hons) in Music Production and DJ Practice, and BA (Hons) in Music Production and Sound Engineering. You can also take the latter as an online degree from anywhere in the world. We offer courses covering production techniques like these at all of our schools, which are completed by Los AngelesIbiza and Mumbai. Any questions? Please get in touch.

Register to Access Free Courses, Plugins, Projects, Samples & More

When you register with Point Blank, you access an array of free sounds, plugins, online course samples, access to our social network Plugged In and much more! Simply register below and visit our Free Stuff page to get your hands on a range of exclusive music-making tools and tutorials provided by the team. Fill your boots!

LONDON W OUTLINE

The post Watch Part 3 of our Miniseries: Ableton Live 10 In Depth – Mixing w/ Push 2 appeared first on Point Blank’s Online Magazine.

Read more here