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Music Tech News: Emerging Technologies and Announcements

This music tech news roundup features the latest announcements and emerging technologies from Behringer, ZONT, Faderfox, KORG, Moog, Steinberg, Onde Magnétique, Ableton, Eric Prydz, and Peter Zinovieff.

Music Tech News

Ableton Live 9.7 Coming Soon

Click here to view the embedded video.

Ableton announces Live 9.7 will be released later this year. Currently in beta, the free update to Live 9 will bring big improvements for Push beatmakers. New features include new slicing options, new drum layout with 16 set velocity levels for playing and programming more dynamic beats, hands-on audio routing improvements, visual feedback for tighter recordings, color customization, better playability, and more.

Read more at Ableton

Behringer Polyphonic Synth

Click here to view the embedded video.

In this third teaser from Behringer, we learn that their new synthesizer is analog, polyphonic, and offers lots of hands-on control. The synth looks and sounds a bit Juno-ish to us so far. Behringer initially announced plans to build a budget polyphonic analog synth back in November 2014, but has only recently released three teaser videos. Rumors have surfaced that the synth emulates the classic ARP Odyssey synth from the ‘80s. The rumors are not yet clear, but since the announcement, Korg has released their own version of the ARP Odyssey, as well as an affordable polyphonic synth called the Minilogue.

Read more on Behringer’s Facebook

Zont Digital Pocket Synth

ZONT

ZONT rolled out the announcement of a ground-breaking pocket-sized digital synthesizer for creating rhythms, sequences, and melodies. About the size and shape of a smartphone, ZONT’s beautiful design looks to be inspired by Teenage Engineering’s Pocket Operator synths but with a few more bells and whistles. From what we know so far is that the synth features interchangeable sound cartridges called ZONT modules which are digital sound engines that can be swapped out. The design also sports soft-to-touch materials, LED-backlit buttons, universal inputs, Bluetooth connection and Wi-Fi cloud sync, USB-C, an iOS and Android app, and a built-in rechargeable battery. The company also announced collaborations with big producers and DJs on some of the presets. Unfortunately, the official website says it won’t be available until the fall of 2017.

Read more at ZONT

Faderfox UC44 Controller

UC44

The UC44 is a compact universal controller that sports eight push-encoders each with a 2-digit-display, 16 faders, 35 buttons, and heap of midi commands all housed in a robust metal carrying case for some serious action. The encoders are switchable to 32 groups meaning you can control a total amount of 512 control parameters. This fully programmable controller is ready for controlling music and video software products out of the box. Also included is a custom control surface script for Ableton Live that provides all necessary mappings to control 16 tracks simultaneously.

Read more at Faderfox

Kamata Wavetable Synth

Click here to view the embedded video.

Developed as a KORG Gadget mobile music production app, Kamata is a synthesizer that lets you play the classic video game sounds of the past. Kamata is a collaboration between KORG and the sound team of the game development company BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc. The sound engine reconstructs the C30 custom sound engine that swept the world in the 1980s. With a 4-bit 32-sample waveform table, detune capability, and full editing of carefully selected parameters, you can design sounds that are both nostalgic and new.

Read more at KORG

Minimoog Model D Returns

Moog

For the first time since 1981, Moog Music has officially resumed production of the Minimoog Model D. The Minimoog Model D was the world’s first portable synthesizer and served as the archetype for all electronic keyboards that followed. First released in the early 1970’s, the instrument gained worldwide acclaim for combining the colossal sound of Moog’s large-format modular synthesizers with the accessibility of pre-wired modules. This 3-oscillator, monophonic, analog synthesizer is securely housed in a locally-sourced Appalachian hardwood enclosure and hand-finished aluminum chassis. The circuit boards retain the exact component placement and through-hole design of a beloved 1970’s era Minimoog Model D. Though no changes have been made to the original sound engine or audio signal path, the Minimoog Model D now includes a series of popular functional modifications that expand this legendary instrument’s sonic capabilities.

Read more at Moog Music

Free iOS Metronome App from Steinberg

Steinberg

Steinberg rolls out a free iOS metronome app called Smart Click that runs on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. Smart Click’s easy-to-use interface lets you focus on practicing effectively and improving your ability to play in time. In addition, this metronome app allows you to choose different time signatures and four types of accents for each beat, including the well-known Cubase click sound. Key features include an accurate metronome engine, easy-to-use interface, visual assistant, various metronome modes, and multiple ways to enter your tempo.

Read more at Steinberg

OM-1 Cassette Synthesizer

Click here to view the embedded video.

Onde Magnétique reveals the OM-1 Cassette Synthesizer, an analog musical instrument that uses a standard cassette tape as its audio source. Inspired by instruments like the Mellotron and Ondes Martenot, the OM-1 is built around the concept that when a continuous tone/note is recorded to tape, its pitch will change as the tape’s playback speed is increased or decreased. Individual notes are playable with the eight buttons, which are also pressure sensitive to control note volumes. The notes can then be pitched with the eight tuning knobs. The OM-1 also features a three-position switch to control attack and release response, CV/Gate inputs to control the cassette’s pitch and volume from a linear voltage sequencer, and powered LED’s.

Read more at Onde Magnétique

Ableton Loop Summit 2016

Ableton Loop

Loop is a three-day summit for music makers that features discussions, performances, presentations, studio sessions, and interactive workshops aimed at exchanging ideas at the cutting edge of music, technology, and creative practice. The event brings together artists, technologists, educators, and other creative thinkers to collaborate on new ideas, share new techniques, and make new connections. Loop is a collective exploration of what it is to make music today and what it could be tomorrow. Tickets are now available.

Read more at Loop Ableton

Eric Prydz Brings EPIC 4.0 to America

Click here to view the embedded video.

The global multi-platform media and entertainment company Mashable gives us an exclusive look behind the scenes at Eric Prydz’s impressive America EPIC 4.0 live show which is arguably the most ambitious and visually pleasing live music show in the world. Eric gives us a look at his preparation, his team’s preparation, the thought behind his music tracks, and the life that he lives as one of the biggest, most respected DJs in the world.

Peter Zinovieff on the EMS Synthi

Click here to view the embedded video.

Peter Zinovieff, a British engineer and electronic music pioneer most notable for his EMS company (Electronic Music Studios), which made the famous VCS3 synthesizer in the late 1960s talks about his legendary Synthi instrument in this exclusive video interview.

 


Mixing and Mastering Program

Transform rough ideas and basic compositions into dance floor bangers and sonically pleasing commercial quality masters. Learn the well-kept industry secrets of EQ, compression, panning, level balancing, reverb and special effects.

Mixing and MasteringAbout This Program

This program gives you everything you need to refine tracks into a clear commercial quality release, including special mixing and mastering techniques for dubstep, techno, house, trance, downtempo, hip-hop, and the gamut of electronically-produced music.

You will learn to mix and master your tracks using the same plugins that top industry engineers use every day, including plugins by Izotope, Soundtoys, Sonnox, Altiverb, and more.

What’s Included

  • Mixing & Mastering Level 1: Mix
  • Mixing & Mastering Level 2: Modify
  • Mixing & Mastering Level 3: Master

Additional Information

Visit the Mixing and Mastering course page for detailed information on this program here.

If you have questions, please call 877.DUBSPOT or send us a message.

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The post Music Tech News: Emerging Technologies and Announcements appeared first on Dubspot Blog.

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New Order – Blue Monday Ableton Live Deconstruction @ SONAR+D 2016

Blue Monday is one of the most iconic songs of all times. Bridging the disco era with what became a house and techno explosion in the UK, New Order created a timeless classic that’s still referenced today as one of the most influential tracks of all time. Last month New Order headlined SONAR festival in Barcelona and when we were asked to take part in SONAR+D – the educational arm of the famous festival – it was a no-brainer to take on the New Order classic in one of our world-famous deconstructions.

We enlisted the help of deconstruction maestro and PB instructor Ski Oakenfull – watch the video above and download the project used by Ski here.

p02w93jgNew Order’s Blue Monday was a landmark track when it was released in 1983 and remains highly influential 33 years later

If you want to learn more sound design, production, mixing, mastering and composition tips, our Online Master Diploma course is perfect for you. Taken from anywhere in the world for up to 64 weeks, it’s one of our most comprehensive courses and has been taken by the likes of Claude Von Stroke, Plastician and Jon Rundell. Find out more here.

Register to Access Free Courses, Plugins, Projects, Samples & More

When you register with Point Blank, you access an array of free sounds, plugins, online course samples, access to our social network Plugged In and much more! Simply register below and visit our Free Stuff page to get your hands on a range of exclusive music-making tools and tutorials provided by the team. Fill your boots!

The post New Order – Blue Monday Ableton Live Deconstruction @ SONAR+D 2016 appeared first on Point Blank’s Online Magazine.

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Music Theory Tutorial: Tips for Better Chord Progressions

Learn the theory behind writing better chord progressions in this guideline that explores basic concepts and advice to help you make creative decisions when building chord phrases.

Chord Progressions

Students often ask how they can write better chord progressions. This simple guideline aims to help you write better chord progressions by introducing general theory and offering some basic advice to get you started down the right path.

Start with Triad Chords

In music theory, a major or minor triad chord is a chord having a root, a minor third, and a perfect fifth. At first, try keeping things simple by creating a chord progression using triad chords in whatever key you are working in. For example, C major has the notes C, E, G. The C minor chord has the notes C, Eb, G. This limitation will help you quickly make decisions about what kind of chords to use in a progression. The trick is to limit yourself which will help you make decisions easier.

C Major Chord

chord progressions

C Minor Chord

chord progressions

Begin and End with the Same Chord or Key

The key identifies the tonic note or chord and is described as a group of notes in which a scale is based on. A scale is an ordered set of notes typically used in a key. Often, popular music of the 20th century will begin and end in the same key because the notes and chords work together to create a sense of completeness when the tonic note or chord returns to resolve the progression. Using other notes and chords outside the key you’re working in creates varying degrees of tension that may sound incomplete or awkward. Resolving progressions using the same chord or key you started with will likely sound more pleasing and will transition better when looping chord progressions. However, this rule is not set in stone so feel free to experiment.

Chord Progression

Move Freely Among Diatonic Chords

Every major and minor scale has seven individual chords called diatonic triads. Diatonic chords are the chords that are derived from only the notes of a key. Each key contains seven different notes. You can think of diatonic chords as a family of chords that are all related by the notes of a key. In addition, they all harmonically work together like one big happy family.

chord progressions

Let’s explore this further using the key of A minor as an example. A natural A minor scale has the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, G. The tonic note is the root note of the scale which is A. Now that we know the key and all the notes in the scale, we can begin building the seven corresponding diatonic chords. Below are all seven diatonic triads in the key of A minor:

  • Am – A, C, E
  • Bdim – B, D, F
  • C – C, E, G
  • Dm – D, F, A
  • Em – E, G, B
  • F – F, A, C
  • G – G, B, D

Tip: You can move freely around diatonic chords in your progressions. They are harmonically compatible. You just have to find the progression that works best for the track.

Using Non-Diatonic Chords To Spice Up Your Progressions

Let’s make things interesting and break the rules a bit by using a chord outside of the diatonic triads. Is that allowed? Yes. Will it sound good? Well, that’s up to you. There is a another category of chords called non-diatonic chords. These are major or minor chords that do not have notes belonging to the specific scale you are working in. Simply put, you can start from a diatonic major chord and move to any other major chord to add some dissonant variety. Just because a note isn’t in a part of a specific scale doesn’t mean that you can’t play it. Many famous jazz solos are great examples. Improvisers frequently relied on outside harmonies to add color to their solos. However, this technique works best when used seldom. In addition, it’s important to end the series of chords on one of the diatonic chords so that the chord progression resolves smoothly. For example, if you start with diatonic major you could move to any other major chord. Any major chord could potentially sound good. The trick is to end the series of major chords on one of the three a diatonic major chords. The same goes for minor chords. Make sure to end on one of three diatonic minor chords. Below is an example of an A minor chord progression with non-diatonic chords.

A Min | F Maj | D Min | Bb Min (Non-Diatonic) | Eb Min (Non-Diatonic) | D Min (Diatonic) 

chord progressions

Cadence Chords

We know that chord progressions resolve best when the last chord is the same as the first chord, but what about the second to last chord? This chord is very important because it helps the music lead into the last chord and signify the end of the progression is coming. This is called a cadence. What’s the difference between a progression and a cadence? Well, progressions happen when one chord changes to another chord, and cadences are a type of progression used to signify that a section or phrase is coming to an end. Cadencing chords are also essential for releasing musical tension. In music, cadences are divided into four types according to their harmonic progression: authentic, plagal, half, and deceptive.

  • Authentic Cadence: This is the most common and basic type of cadence. An authentic cadence comes in two varieties: a Perfect Authentic Cadence (PAC) and an Imperfect Authentic Cadence (IAC). An authentic cadence is one that moves from a dominant chord to the tonic chord.
  • Plagal Cadence: This is often called an “Amen” cadence because it’s commonly used to end many traditional hymns. It is described as being generally weaker than an authentic cadence. There is less tension and more of a feeling of relaxation.
  • Half Cadence: This cadence is described as giving a feeling of pause and rest. There is also a feeling of incompleteness. The half cadence suggests that more needs to be said, either as a continuation or an answering phrase.
  • Deceptive Cadence: This is considered a weak cadence because of the hanging or suspended feel it invokes. The effect of the deceptive cadence can be quite dramatic depending on what chord you actually land on. A tamer deceptive cadence will move to a chord that is still closely related to the tonic. A more dramatic shift will come from moving to a more distantly related chord.

Below is an example of an authentic cadence in C major.

  • Cadence 1 progresses from a D minor to G major chord (IAC).
  • Cadence 2 progresses from a G major to C major chord (PAC).

Cadence 1

chord progressions

Cadence 2

chord progressions

Test Drive the Root Notes of Your Progressions

One way to feel out the vibe of your progressions is by taking the root notes of all of the chords and playing them like a singable melody. If they sound good, then you probably have a great chord progression on your hands. Many people often like to start with this step to build a pattern and then go back and build up the chords.

A Min | E Min | D Min | C Maj | Eb Maj | G Maj | D Min | G Min | D Min | E Min | A Min

Chord Progressions

Conclusion

These basic guidelines are tried-and-true approaches for writing great chord progressions you can you as the main feature in a song or as the underlying force for all of the other melodic tracks. The next step is to learn how to bend them and discover new possibilities that will help define your own sound – that’s the fun part!

 


EDU Summer Sessions

Music Foundations Program

Unravel electronic music’s origins, build your chops, learn musical language and theory, and make and play music the way you want. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the roots and lineage of a variety of electronic and dance music genres, strengthen their keyboard skills, and learn valuable music theory, deepening their creative practice and facilitating effective collaborations with musical partners.

Click here to view the embedded video.

About This Program

The best producers, DJs, and musicians in the world strive to be well-rounded. So should you. In Dubspot’s Music Foundations Program, you’ll explore three major aspects of music: rhythmic theory, melodic theory, and critical listening.

Most pioneering early electronic musicians had years of conservatory training in theory and performance but had access to very limited technologies. In today’s musical world, it’s the opposite: we have a powerful and versatile array of electronic music making tools at our fingertips, but often fall short in our theoretical understanding of how electronic music works.

Our Music Foundations program is designed to fill this gap and provide training in fundamental skills and concepts with the electronic musician, DJ, and producer in mind. In this course, you’ll build your chops and learn the basics of musical language and theory so that you can make and play the music you want. You will also develop a deeper understanding of the roots and lineage of a variety of electronic and dance music genres, and explore compositional techniques and song structure. The weekly homework lessons for all three courses have been designed using Ableton Live, and along the way you’ll also learn the basics of Ableton and how to use it as a powerful tool to improve your musicianship in a variety of ways.

What’s Included

  • Music Foundations Level 1: Pads & Rhythmic Theory
  • Music Foundations Level 2: Keys & Melodic Theory
  • Music Foundations Level 3: Critical Listening

Additional Information

Visit the Music Foundations course page for detailed information on this program here.

If you have questions, please call 877.DUBSPOT or send us a message.

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The Secret To Success As A Music Producer

[As you may know by now, yesterday we opened up 100 places to join the BassGorilla club as a Lifetime Member.

It’s no surprise that many of those places have been taken in the last 24 hours already… If you don’t want to miss out, go here to learn more.]

Today I want to share a story with you about something that I experienced a few years ago…

Back in 2012, I was desperate to get my music signed by a label and make an impact on more people.

To me, it was a personal goal that I was striving to achieve BADLY.

Why?

Because I wanted to prove to myself (and to my friends) that I was good enough to make the kind of music that record label owners would sign… I wanted my “TALENTS” to be recognized.

So I worked on my music extremely hard. I even took a full year off work to focus on my music. I kept approaching labels with my finished tracks.

But no matter how close I came, I would get NOWHERE.

Then, one day, I was feeling tired, stuck and frustrated.

So I reached out to someone. A person who had already accomplished the exact things I wanted to… A “mentor” if you will.

He took me under his wing and helped me to hone my music production skills. I made huge progress in a short space of time with his help.

Pretty soon, I released my first EP on a well respected record label and I hit the top 20 on BeatPort! I finally achieved what I wanted to, and I felt great!

So why am I sharing this story with YOU?

Very few people are born with special “talents”… Even those who go on to become world class athletes, nobel prize winning scientists, and yes, even famous music producers.

You see, skills can be learned and applied. It’s all about TAKING ACTION.

When we face resistance while trying to grow our skills, it’s easy to give up and think, “Oh well, it was never meant to be.”

That is a FATAL mistake if you want to succeed at anything in life. Any growth requires persistence.

But by far, the FASTEST way to accelerate your growth is to find someone who has already done what you want to achieve.

That person will show you the path to get there faster than trying to go it alone.

It was with this experience that I decided to create BassGorilla.

I wanted to create a place where anyone can access the knowledge and wisdom of proven experts, to accelerate their learning rapidly.

These days I’m so amazed when I see what our members are achieving. They grow from beginner / intermediate level, to advanced producers –

– getting their music signed,

– climbing the charts on BeatPort,

– getting recognized for their skills

…And that all comes from knowing how to make inspiring and amazing music!

Our “Backstage Pass” platform provides you with a treasure trove of the newest ways to make cutting-edge music, taught by cutting-edge producers…

For the next 7 days, we have a very exclusive opportunity available for a limited number of action takers.

Because we only want the most motivated and passionate producers to be a part of our community, we are limiting the number of available spots to just 100.

So if you’re serious about taking action to give your music a serious lift quickly, you’ll definitely want to take advantage of this.

Go here to learn more

Hope to see you on the inside very soon,

Luke

The post The Secret To Success As A Music Producer appeared first on BassGorilla.com.

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Dubspot Interview: Mike Monday + Production Advice and Tips

Famed producer and music trainer Mike Monday sits down with Dubspot’s Michael Walsh to discuss his workflow approach, productivity, and passion of coaching creative people on how to succeed.

As a DJ I’ve known of Mike Monday‘s work for years. A few of his jams haven’t left my record box for a decade now, so I’m definitely a fan. I have also recently become more intimate with Mike’s inspirational work by way of his blog – a place where he offers motivational advice and creative tips for musicians. If you follow our blog, you may have come across his words of wisdom in some other creative advice articles such as 10 Tips to Fight Writer’s Block and Increase Studio Productivity. To put it mildly, we are fans of his advice! This excerpt from his blog will give you an idea of what we mean:

“How to Turn Your Inner Critic into Your Greatest Asset: Your inner critic is your most reliable guide of what not to do. So when that voice in your head says you’ve not got the right tools, use even less. When it thinks you’ve gone too far, go further. And when it tells you it’s not good enough, finish it anyway. Go wherever you feel the most resistance because this is where the magic happens.” – Mike Monday

Mike Monday’s productions continue to be in high rotation by pivotal figures in the industry such as Claude VonStroke, M.A.N.D.Y. Jesse Rose, and Tiefschwarzas to name a few. Although now he focuses more on training musicians he still produces music, and has even scored a film called La Bendición. His embark on a mission to help musicians and music producers at all levels of skill, success, and experience to finish more music in less time with better results has led him to share powerful advice and develop training courses available through his blog. He is also a Neuro-Linguistic Programming coach (NLP) which is the study of human excellence that aim’s to enhance your performance, learning, and development.

 

 

After reading his blog and corresponding for a few months, I caught up with Mike to discuss things he’s written about such as creative workflow, how to finish projects, and how to approach creativity for prolific results. Mike was also kind enough to provide a FREE eBook he’s written called “30 Things Every Music Producer Should Know.”

[contact-form-7]

 


Mike Monday Interview

Mike Monday

I was reading on your blog that you’ve produced 250 singles. That’s a lot of singles.

It’s gotta be more than that, including remixes and releases under various guises. I think it’s getting up to about 300 or 400 tracks.

When did you start releasing those tracks and how long has it been?

I started writing my first track in 1994. I started working with Andrew Kato from Groove Armada. We lived in the same flat together in South London because we went to the same university together. I essentially started what I was doing because of what he was doing. It wasn’t really my dream, which was the ironic thing. So that was why I started immediately after university, and then I just carried on doing it under various guises for various people.

Has it been an ebb and flow where sometimes you’ve been very prolific and sometimes you don’t do something for a while or is there a steady schedule for your music work?

Usually a steady schedule. But over the last couple years, I’ve started to write and release a lot less. I did that ten track in ten weeks project and done a couple of remixes here and there. I also did something for ‘Get Physical’ and for Tim Sheridan’s label ‘Very Very Wrong Indeed.’ Now I’m working on some music for an independent film out of LA. Although, I’ve been doing a lot less recently apart from the last year and a half or so. It’s probably followed a fairly steady schedule; the only difference has been an ebb and flow in whether I’m feeling it or not.

Having said that about your work schedule, what advice would you give up and coming producers or people who are poking away at trying to produce music?

Get something out. That would be my number one piece of advice. It doesn’t matter what it is – just get something out. Just the other day I was on Beatport looking at my profile, and there is this re-release of an old remix I did ages ago, and I’m absolutely embarrassed that it’s been re-released. Gah! But you know what, it doesn’t matter. Until you actually put something out, you’ve not done anything.

What track was that?

It’s a remix of an old Beat Foundation tune called “Save Me.” I was in Beat Foundation with Andy Kato, and that was our thing. It was on what I think was on the first ever DJ compilations with Sasha, Oakenfold, Carl Cox, and Pete Tong. Sasha used “Save Me” on his mix. I listen to it now and go “oh God, why did they re-release it?” Because to me, it’s not aged that well. But at the end of the day, my advice to other people is to get it finished, get it out, and move on.

Click here to view the embedded video.

It’s common that artists judge one another and strive for play from other DJs. I’ve heard the advice that “you’re only as good as your last record.” Would you say that is true?

I think people are gonna think what they think no matter what you do, and that’s great. People are gonna like what they like, and they’re probably gonna like things you think they don’t like, and they’re not gonna like the things you think they’re gonna love. The bottom line is,  you’re only as good as your last record to yourself. If you know that what you did is great, it doesn’t really matter. You gotta trust yourself, and if you get it wrong, it’s learning.

I was reading your eBook this morning, and you said something interesting I wanted to ask about. You mention that when people who say they don’t listen to other people’s opinions or say that they just make music for themselves that this is sort of a fallacy, which nobody really makes music for themselves.

Some people do it because they love to do it and for no other reason, but it’s impossible to do it just for yourself. No one can be completely internal and not influenced by the world around them; that’s just ridiculous.

Another part of the eBook that was poignant and interesting was when you say “We don’t need another Richie Hawtin. We don’t need another Aphex Twin. Be you.” Is it a common thing that people don’t have confidence in their original material?

Absolutely. A lot of people I talk to that want to be more original. My first question is, “What’s stopping you?” What’s stopping people is the things they don’t focus on like their values and their beliefs about themselves. By breaking down those beliefs, they can get a helluva lot further than just trying to learn more or buy more stuff. I’m a firm believer that anyone who’s ever taken a Dubspot course or reads the Dubspot blog regularly already has the techniques they need to make the greatest music that this planet has ever seen. I’m absolutely sure of that.

Today the internet is our primary tool for distributing music, which also brings a lot of chatter in comments and forums. Whether on Facebook or SoundCloud, we are sharing our art and opinions with one another. Would you say these discussions people are having help or inhibit the musician with regards to creativity?

Whether it’s helpful or unhelpful very much depends on the person who is writing the music. I think anyone that tries not to be influenced is still influenced by that stuff. All that’s ever said to you, and all you’ve ever experienced will influence, in some way, what you do.

How do you get to a point where you’ve built a barrier for your own creativity but still being open to others opinions?

This is my strategy: I keep my creative time to a few separate hours from the time I’m online. If that wasn’t possible, I’d probably go for a bike ride or meditate for fifteen minutes and completely unwind before starting on music again. I wouldn’t go straight from one thing to another.

“Bhalobashi” was a staple of M.A.N.D.Y. sets who included it on their Fabric mix and was described by IDJ as ʻone of the top 100 essential dance tracks of the last 10 years.’

Click here to view the embedded video.

As a musician have you had the experience of being influenced by what people say about your work?

Oh, absolutely. There are different kinds of people. There are some people who are less influenced by what goes on around them, and they don’t naturally pay so much attention. They are influenced, but less. They are more internal. They know when they’ve done something good, and they don’t need someone else to tell them. Other people are very external. I’m very external. There are benefits to both. I’m not saying people are totally external or totally internal; I think there are different levels. To a certain extent, I would say the urge to perform has to come from some external urge for validation. In terms of writing music on their own, there are some people who hate to perform. I would think that they are very internal. They just do it, and they know that it’s within themselves whether it’s good or not.

I want to talk about how you came from a place of making 250 plus tracks/releases to the place where it seems like over the past year or so you’ve gotten very interested in writing, teaching, and coaching. What was your motivation to start teaching and how did you get involved with the neural/linguistic programming?

My motivation originally started with creating a website to start promoting my music myself.

So it was a promotional tool first?

Yes, Initially. Then I just found that everything was ‘me, me, me, me’ and started to feel it was very focused inward on myself, so I decided to try to start to help other people do what I’ve been doing for years. I figured I probably know quite a lot about this stuff given I’ve been doing it for over sixteen years, so I started writing articles about the stresses and struggles that I’d been through. I found the reaction and the fulfillment I got from that was just enormous. I also think that if all this social media happened earlier in my career, I would have probably done the same thing. What I’m doing now is in much more in alignment with who I am.

Between July and September 2010 I wrote and released one track a week for ten weeks. The project was called “10 Tracks 10 Weeks.” I also wrote blog posts as I completed each track as I went along describing my experiences with the process.

 

 

How did the coaching come about?

It’s funny actually. It’s one of those things I didn’t choose to find; it’s almost like it found me. I’ve had a number of people respond to the site about the stuff I had written before I discovered NLP. Someone said “I could tell you were into NLP” and I was like, I wrote that stuff before I knew about it. I discovered NLP by doing this coaching seminar because they were also offering an NLP practitioner course.

What is NLP?

Neuro-Linguistic Programming. The neuro refers to the mind and the body. The Linguistic part refers to language, obviously, but that is not just the spoken word it is also the way that we express ourselves and also our body language, which some people think is actually more expressive than the words that come out. There is some psychology, some cybernetics, some systems theory, and some anthropology. Basically a conglomeration of different subjects on how different people do things.

As a coach, what would you suggest to students who says “I’m stuck?”

Well, it really depends on the reason they’re stuck. If they’re stuck, then that means at some point they weren’t stuck. If they know they’re stuck, then they know what stuck is, so therefore what I would do is ask them the difference between when they are stuck and when they are unstuck. I would also ask them very specifically what they were doing when they’re stuck, how they hold themselves. There are 101 different things: what they think about, what they say to themselves, etc. when they are stuck versus when they’re unstuck. Knowing these details helps me compare what the differences are. Then it’s a matter of actually identifying what the strategies are that they use in order to make themselves unstuck.

 


EDU Summer Sessions

Music Foundations Program

Unravel electronic music’s origins, build your chops, learn musical language and theory, and make and play music the way you want. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the roots and lineage of a variety of electronic and dance music genres, strengthen their keyboard skills, and learn valuable music theory, deepening their creative practice and facilitating effective collaborations with musical partners.

Click here to view the embedded video.

About This Program

The best producers, DJs, and musicians in the world strive to be well-rounded. So should you. In Dubspot’s Music Foundations Program, you’ll explore three major aspects of music: rhythmic theory, melodic theory, and critical listening.

Most pioneering early electronic musicians had years of conservatory training in theory and performance but had access to very limited technologies. In today’s musical world, it’s the opposite: we have a powerful and versatile array of electronic music making tools at our fingertips, but often fall short in our theoretical understanding of how electronic music works.

Our Music Foundations program is designed to fill this gap and provide training in fundamental skills and concepts with the electronic musician, DJ, and producer in mind. In this course, you’ll build your chops and learn the basics of musical language and theory so that you can make and play the music you want. You will also develop a deeper understanding of the roots and lineage of a variety of electronic and dance music genres, and explore compositional techniques and song structure. The weekly homework lessons for all three courses have been designed using Ableton Live, and along the way you’ll also learn the basics of Ableton and how to use it as a powerful tool to improve your musicianship in a variety of ways.

What’s Included

  • Music Foundations Level 1: Pads & Rhythmic Theory
  • Music Foundations Level 2: Keys & Melodic Theory
  • Music Foundations Level 3: Critical Listening

Additional Information

Visit the Music Foundations course page for detailed information on this program here.

If you have questions, please call 877.DUBSPOT or send us a message.

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The post Dubspot Interview: Mike Monday + Production Advice and Tips appeared first on Dubspot Blog.

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Only 100 Of These Are Available…

Hey, it’s Luke here from BassGorilla.

In the last week, we’ve had over 1,149 people take part in the BassGorilla Resampling Challenge, and the results have been brilliant! 

The doors closed for new entries last night. Since then my team and I have been going through everyone’s entries. There have been some amazing tracks sent in! The winner of the Arturia Keylab midi keyboard will be announced next Monday. 

To follow up, we’ve opened up 100 places available for you to get a Lifetime membership to BassGorilla.

Go here to find out more about BassGorilla Lifetime Memberships

As you may know, BassGorilla’s Backstage Pass gives you access to the most cutting-edge music production methods, taught by world famous producers and industry professionals.

Usually, the only way to get access is through a monthly subscription, which means you lose access once you cancel your subscription. 

What does a Lifetime Membership do for you? 

Not only does it give you lifelong access to all current courses in our tutorial library, but all future courses as well! 

That means no subscriptions, no losing access when you cancel, plus lifelong access to our exclusive members-only community, so you can ask questions, get new ideas, make friends with like-minded producers and enjoy your experience on a much deeper level, for the rest of your life!

Why are we limiting it to 100 places only?

We’ve done this because of several reasons:

1. We only want the most motivated action takers to take advantage of this opportunity.

2. The pricing of our Lifetime Membership is ridiculously low, especially compared to the value you’ll get from it. We can’t afford to let more than 100 people get a Lifetime Membership, or it could hurt our business.

When Is The Deadline?

The doors close on Tuesday 26th July at 11:59PM Pacific time…

BUT: 

If 100 people join us before that date, we will close the doors before the deadline.

Who Is This For? Who Is It Not For? 

This is for you if you:

  • Want to give yourself an unfair advantage over other producers and accelerate your skills faster
  • Want to learn directly from proven experts, who regularly release EPs on labels and are often smashing the BeatPort charts 
  • Want to make more impact on more people with your music and possibly even get your music signed by a label in the future

This is not for people who:

  • Aren’t willing to learn new things
  • Don’t want to make professional quality music
  • Complain and blame others when they don’t succeed
  • Are not willing to try applying what they’ve learned to their own music

I hope to see you join the club soon!

Luke

P.S. I’ll let you know many places are available as we get closer to the deadline (Tuesday 26th July at 11:59PM Pacific time). If we get to 100 new lifetime members before then, we’ll close the doors early. So hurry! Join the club today, while there’s still time!

The post Only 100 Of These Are Available… appeared first on BassGorilla.com.

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Point Blank Recommends #31

Summer 2016 may have thrown a fair few curveballs, but here’s one thing you can rely on: Point Blank Recommends is the immutable guide to the month’s essential new music recommendations. That’s not to say we’re playing it safe –  as usual, PBR#31 covers a broad spectrum of electronic music perfect for these strange times, so open your mind, your ears and a fresh tab on your browser of choice and get refreshing those listening habits with our handy Soundcloud playlist.

Taking the temperature of where music’s at in July 2016, we’ve loaded up on some D∆WN – yes, that’s Dawn Richard – on Fade to Mind with Kingdom on the beat. There’s also a cut from Marquis Hawkes’ awesome Social Housing LP on Houndstooth plus Krystal Klear reworks his ‘Squad’ track into eight minutes of languid, long-form house on ‘Squad Pt. 2’. Too chill? Get stuck into the latest for M.E.S.H. or the blown out techno of Imre Kiss. Whatever your tastes there should be something here to get you going.

Still hungry for new music? Get on over to the Point Blank Music YouTube channel to discover what’s going down on our label, and be sure to subscribe to keep ahead of the curve. And if all this is inspiring you and you can see yourself on the Point Blank Recommends playlist one day, you should join us. Our online diploma course can take your music to the next level. It covers everything from mixing your tracks, composition skills and mastering too.

Register to Access Free Courses, Plugins, Projects, Samples & More

When you register with Point Blank, you access an array of free sounds, plugins, online course samples, access to our social network Plugged In and much more! Simply register below and visit our Free Stuff page to get your hands on a range of exclusive music-making tools and tutorials provided by the team. Fill your boots!

The post Point Blank Recommends #31 appeared first on Point Blank’s Online Magazine.

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Check Out Our Latest Plugin Of The Week: NI Monark

The Minimoog is undoubtedly one of the most famous synths of all time. One of the first to bring the power of synthesis into a portable form, it kick started a synth revolution and put the Moog name on the map. 45 years later, the original model is not only expensive but fragile and often difficult to source. It’s led to a wealth of recreations in both hardware and software and in 2013 Native Instruments released their own unofficial tribute via their modular software Reaktor.

Titled Monark, it’s the focus of our second Plugin of the Week, streamed live on Facebook last Friday. In it we look at how the synth works, the sound of its oscillators and some extra tricks round back. Watch it above and make sure you subscribe for more live events and free tutorials.

minimoog-model-d_front

If you want to learn more sound design, production, mixing, mastering and composition tips, our Online Master Diploma course is perfect for you. Taken from anywhere in the world for up to 64 weeks, it’s one of our most comprehensive courses and has been taken by the likes of Claude Von Stroke, Plastician and Jon Rundell. Find out more here.

Register to Access Free Courses, Plugins, Projects, Samples & More

When you register with Point Blank, you access an array of free sounds, plugins, online course samples, access to our social network Plugged In and much more! Simply register below and visit our Free Stuff page to get your hands on a range of exclusive music-making tools and tutorials provided by the team. Fill your boots!

The post Check Out Our Latest Plugin Of The Week: NI Monark appeared first on Point Blank’s Online Magazine.

Read more here