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The Music Production News Feed

Subscribe to Point Blank Music to Win an Online Course, Worth £1,290!

If you haven’t subscribed to Point Blank Music yet, what are you waiting for? Not only will you be the first to hear brand new music by tomorrow’s biggest names (bragging rights as standard), but you could land yourself one of our Complete online courses, worth £1,290.

In 2011 we launched our own in-house label as a way to showcase the incredible talent of Point Blank students and alumni. In March, we embarked on phase two and launched the Point Blank Music YouTube channel as a platform to push the music even further and – along with label partners including Axtone, Defected, Toolroom, Cr2 and more – give the artists we believe in a chance to be discovered by music fans across the globe. Now, to help us get the word out, we’re offering one lucky subscriber the chance to win one of our two-week long online courses – all you have to do is subscribe to Point Blank Music before 5th June to be in with a chance of landing the prize.

Online CourseOur online courses offer 1-2-1 tutorials between you and your instructor every two weeks

Maybe you’ll even be the the next break out star of Point Blank Music? The prize includes a choice of one of our Complete courses, all of which run for four months – choose from Complete Mixing and Mastering, Complete Electronic Music Composition, Complete Electronic Music Production, Complete Ableton Live or Complete Logic Pro. If you’ve not signed up to the channel yet, you best head on over and get to know – so far we’ve released brand new music from rising stars including Fake Bear, Sub One and our latest signee, the South African house producer So Schway. Getting your music signed, released, and earning money from it through our own in-house label Point Blank Music is just one of the many reasons to study with us. Our Online Music Production Master Diploma is not only the most comprehensive course available online, but it offers 1-2-1 tutorials between you and your instructor every two weeks, alongside live masterclasses and the opportunity to received customised feedback for your work as you progress.

Register to Access Free Courses, Plugins, Projects, Samples & More

When you register with Point Blank, you access an array of free sounds, plugins, online course samples, access to our social network Plugged In and much more! Simply register below and visit our Free Stuff page to get your hands on a range of exclusive music-making tools and tutorials provided by the team. Fill your boots!

ONLINE w outline

The post Subscribe to Point Blank Music to Win an Online Course, Worth £1,290! appeared first on Point Blank’s Online Magazine.

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Finally Understanding Levels and Clipping

Over the years I’ve seen a lot of confusion out there about levels and clipping during mixing – but only recently I came to realise that the confusion was so deep that people were altering their mixes to avoid clipping that wasn’t even really happening! Once and for all, I thought I’d lay out for people in highly technical terms, but hopefully still keeping it fun too, everything they need to know about digital audio and clipping so that they can finally realise how little they really need to know. If your the type of person who has found themselves worriedly watching the meters more than your listening to the sound, this tutorial will put your mind at rest and your concentration back to the fun part: making music.

/Ryan

 

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How to Make Grime Drums using Ableton Live 9

In this tutorial, I am going to show you how to make Grime drums using Ableton Live 9. Grime is a very popular genre in UK and it draws its influences from UK Garage. By using fast paced hats and silence in some parts, drums really have a nice flow. So let’s get started and make some drums.

First of all, you need to pick some kicks, snares and hats. Grime is really characterized by that raw sound so layering won’t be needed. Instead of it, we are going to focus on getting the right arrangement and nice sounds . Also, don’t forget to disable warping in Ableton, since you are using one shots.

When you’ve picked the right one shots,set the BPM on 140 and  focus on the arrangement. This is probably the most important part, as it gives our beat a flow, and getting it right is very important. Good way to start arranging is to start with a regular two step rhythm. Then we are going to move the position of snare and add some kicks.

Next, we are going  to add some hihats. You can often hear in grime couple of fast paced hats and then silence between them. Also, try to use couple of hihat samples. Change the velocity of drums to make it feel more “human”. Also, I’ve applied some swing, but that’s optional.

We’ve done the arrangement, so now we are going to process our drums. First, we are going to remove low frequencies on our snare and hihats, so they won’t clash with the other bass frequencies in our mix later.

Now let’s change the panning of our hats to give our drums more width, but keep the kick and snare in mono. Then, we are going to add really subtle reverb to our hats. Put the Low cut in the input processing window and disable chorus. Set the Pre Delay on minimum and Decay Time on 400 ms. In the Diffusion Network window, enable Low.

Then, we are going to export all the elements of drums individually.  I think the fastest way to do it is to just duplicate your drum rack ( in this case 5 times, since we have 5 one shots), soloing the kick, snare and hihats, freezing all tracks ( right click, freeze) and then flattening them. You will get your drum sounds as audio waveform in audio tracks, therefore, it will make our processing a lot easier and cleaner.

Next up, we are going to group our drums. Then, we are going to apply a subtle compression on the group, as your rhythm will really benefit from it. Put the attack really low, release somewhere between 10-15 ms. Threshold should be around -8 dB and ratio 2.38 : 1. Also, I’ve put the dry/wet on 64%. It really is a matter of taste, and remember to always use your ears.

Now that we’ve done the compression, put the Overdrive plugin on snare and kick and add a really subtle distortion. Doing it will give our drums more punch and rawness. I suggest leaving Drive and Tone on 50%, but change dry/wet to around 10% and Dynamics should be fine on about 60%. Center frequency should be on approximately 850 Hz and  width of the bandpass on 0.50. It’s important that your kick sounds thumping.

When you distort your kick and snare, put the saturator on group track. With a bit of saturation, our drums will be punchier and overall louder.Put the curve type on Soft Sine. Drive should be around 1 dB and turn on the soft clipping. Also, I’ve set the dry/wet ratio on 75%. Your drums should be clipping, but not overdriven.

Last is applying some New York/Parallel compression. We are going to add second audio signal that will be more dynamically squashed but consistent. It will make our drums even more punch and power. I will be using free VST compressor called TDR Kotelnikov. It is a really great sounding compressor and I highly recommend it as it doesn’t cost a penny.

So first, we are going to export our whole drums. When done, put the compressor on freshly exported audio signal. I’ve set the threshold around -25dB, attack and release should be really fast and ratio should be 7:1. Now reintroduce the compressed drum track and fine tune its volume. It should sound more punchy and powerful.

So here it is, this is how you make Grime drums in Ableton Live 9. Keep in mind that your drums should be really simple and raw, don’t over process them and focus on your arrangement. Drums are the base of your track, as they will set the mood of the track.

The post How to Make Grime Drums using Ableton Live 9 appeared first on BassGorilla.com.

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